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Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France

Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France

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Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France

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Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France

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Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France

July 10, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France yqz
Removable Panel To Display Clock ~ Unique! Ending July 20, 2014 18:50:01 PDT http://yqz.me/Carriage-Clock

Up in this auction is a 19th century Carriage Brass & Glass Clock signed French. It has its ORIGINAL BOX which is quite unique. The box has a red

Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France

Antique 19th C Brass French Carriage Clock ORIGINAL BOX Victorian Era France

removable panel that will allow the clock to be seen with it fully inside. This would help to protect it while it was riding around. It is quite unique that an original box would still be in such good shape, given the age. It has an rectangle beveled glass view window on the top under a small swing handle, and the other 4 sides are flaned with the same great beveled glass. The white face has a few hairlines through it, but they do not seem to hinder performance. This piece is in working order as it stands, however it will need a good once over when you receive it, as with any antique clock that is shipped any distance. The piece is signed only France on the face. A well made clock in a small package with its original box. It measures approx. 5″ tall and 3 1/4″ wide by only 2 1/2″ deep. The box measures approx. 4″ x 3 1/2″ x 5 1/4″. The box is near shabby chic condition, just wear commensurate with age and a crack across the lid that does not hinder function. What a fun find! Good Luck!

Chinese 1600’s Qing Kangxi Hawthorne Plum Prunus Blue White Porcelain Vase

June 20, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

Chinese 1600’s Qing Kangxi Hawthorne Plum Prunus Blue White Porcelain Vase yqz
18 in Tall Ex Museum Collection Bergen Auction Ending (Jun 30, 2014 18:32:01 PDT) http://yqz.me/Vase_Chinese_1600

China, late 1600’s early 1700’s. Qing Kangxi Hawthorne Plum Prunus Blue White Porcelain Vase Ex Museum Coll. Bergen. Of baluster form with a very

Chinese 1600's Qing Kangxi Hawthorne Plum Prunus Blue White Porcelain Vase

Chinese 1600’s Qing Kangxi Hawthorne Plum Prunus Blue White Porcelain Vase

high rounded shoulder and straight tapering body to a hidden footring, the mouth relatively wide and with a flaring rim. The body covered with a cracked ice pattern reserving prunus branches and blossoms. Base marked with a double blue ring. Kangxi period, 1662 – 1722. Ex Collection Munthe and formerly in the Vestlandske Kunstindustrimuseum (West Norway Museum of Applied Art), Bergen, Norway. The collection of the General Johan Wilhelm Normann Munthe (1864 – 1935) and by descent through the family, sold previously in the 26OCT01 sale of the Munthe Collection . found in a museum publication – “The largest collection of Chinese art in Norway numbers some 2,500 items in the fields of sculpture, painting, bronzes, jades, ceramics and textiles …. magnificent collection is the work of General Johan Wilhelm Normann Munthe who spent most of his life in China from 1886 – 1935. His career was both adventurous and impressive starting in the International Maritime Customs Service at the age of 22 and culminating in his position as a Chinese general and trusted advisory to Yuan Shikai, the first president of the New Republic of China {self proclaimed Emperor Hongxian}. Shabby Chic Condition with Damage to the neck may require more professional restoration. Clean breaks (see photos). It measures approx. 17 1/2″ tall.

For those not familiar with Anthony Lee here is his bio: Anthony M. Lee is an institutional, market and collection consultant specializing in the arts of China, Japan, Korea, Himalayan Kingdoms, South and Southeast Asia. Starting as a salesperson at age 14 in Chinese antiques in a family business, he went on to university studies in Asian arts, as well as receiving his licenses in tea ceremony, with further studies of ceramics and religious art over eight years in Japan. For several years he was an associate dealer with Sotheby’s online site and consultant with various auction houses and museums. Anthony has acted as consultant to over 20 museums, government agencies and trusts including the largest museums in Canada and the US, as well as major collectors, dealers, insurance and transportation companies worldwide.

He is considered by many to be one of the foremost experts in the world in Asian Art & Artifacts.

Anthony Lee started a website ages ago called Asianart. It is a place to post photos of your items and have experts identify them for you. (You can still post things there and folks will help you.) He no longer moderates it and identifies things for us as here on eBay as an old friend.

Turkey 19th C Yatagan Yataghan Turk Ottoman Sword Dagger Kilij Knife Sabre

June 12, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

Turkey 19th C Yatagan Yataghan Turk Ottoman Sword Dagger Kilij Knife Sabre
Signed in Nasta’liq Script & Fragmentary 8 Sided Star (Jun 18, 2014 18:34:01 PDT) http://yqz.me/Sword-dagger

Turkey 19th C Yatagan Yataghan Turk Ottoman Sword Dagger  Kilij Knife Sabre http://yqz.me/Sword-dagger

Turkey 19th C Yatagan Yataghan Turk Ottoman Sword Dagger Kilij Knife Sabre http://yqz.me/Sword-dagger


Turkey, late 1800’s early 1900’s. Yatagan Yataghan Turk Ottoman Sword Dagger Kilij Knife Sabre. The long single bladed knife form slightly curved inward toward the grip with traditional bone grip and wide flaring pommel bolsters hafted onto the copper sheath handle over the steel blade, there is a break to one side of the grip/handle. The collar of elongated chevron form with leaves and bead hammered in the copper over the blade base with cast raised designs in two registers closer to the grip. The back of the curving blade with a single groove and even width tapering in the final fifth of the length. The blade with silver inlaid inscription in Nasta’liq script and reverse with a fragmentary eight sided star in a roundel – armoury or maker’s mark (?). Hammered brass scabbard cover with old leather mounts, in a design of lozenges with repetition of the name of Allah, and roses alternating. the large bolster ends suggesting a Balkan origin for this sword. It measures aprpox. 32 1/4″ long in the sheath.

Description composed by world renowned Asian expert & appraiser, Mr. Anthony Lee. http://yqz.me/Sword-dagger

Museum Quality African Artifacts Up For Auction

June 6, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

Antique 30 Inch African Sculpture Yoruba Statue Seed Bead Face Clothes Hair
Cowrie Shells Dangle From Her ‘Hair’-So Cool! http://yqz.me/African-artifacts
Auction Start Jun 07, 2014 19:10:01 PDT and Ends June 17, 19:10:01 PDT

African artifacts. They range from tourist pieces to museum quality items. We are not experts in this area, but we can read labels on some of them and match others online. If we get something wrong, just let us know and we will try and post it here so everyone can see. We are putting them up in separate auctions over the next few weeks. Check back regularly to see what we get up. GOOD LUCK!!

This piece is a sculpture covered in multiple colors of seed beads, which was identified to us as being from Nigeria, the Yoruba tribe. You can see

http://yqz.me/African-artifacts

http://yqz.me/African-artifacts

that this depicts a woman holding a covered dish in her hands. She is mounted on a base that measures approx. 5½” by 6″, and she stands approx. 30″ tall. You can see that this is old, lots of years of discoloration and dust, not to mention small spots where beads have fallen off over the years. The hair is covered in slightly larger beads, creating the illusion of plaited hair. The braids at the front have cowrie shells at the ends. Please see photos for what we lack words to describe, and feel free to ask questions. Good Luck!

We found this on the Zyama website, a great website on African art, about the Yoruba people:

The Yoruba people, numbering over 12 million, are the largest nation in Africa with an art-producing tradition. Most of them live in southwest Nigeria, with considerable communities further west in the Republic of Benin and in Togo. They are divided into approximately twenty separate subgroups, which were traditionally autonomous kingdoms. Excavation at Ife of life-sized bronze and terracotta heads and full-length figures of royalty and their attendants have startled the world, surpassing in their portrait-like naturalism everything previously known from Africa. The cultural and artistic roots of the Ife masters of the Classical Period (ca. 1050—1500) lie in the more ancient cultural center of Nok to the northeast, though the precise nature of this link remains obscure.

Now two-third of the Yoruba are farmers. Even if they live in the city, they keep a hut close to the fields; they grow corn, beans, cassava, yams, peanuts, coffee, and bananas. It is they who control the markets — along with the merchants and artisans: blacksmiths, copper workers, embroiderers, and wood sculptors, trades handed down from generation to generation.

The Yoruba gods form a true pantheon; the creator god, Olodumare, reigns over almost four hundred orisha (deities) and nature spirits who live among the rocks, trees, and rivers. Their figures, more often of Shango (also spelled Sango and Sagoe), deity of thunder and lightning are carved from wood and kept in shrines. Sculptors have studios in which apprentices learn the techniques of the master and his stylistic preferences. Throughout Yorubaland, human figures are represented in a fundamentally naturalistic way, except for bulging eyes; flat, protruding, and usually parallel lips; and stylized ears. Within the basic canon of Yoruba sculpture, many local styles can be distinguished, down to the hand of the individual artist. Today, Nigeria is structured by a number of cults. The Gelede cult pays homage to the power of elderly women. During Gelede festivities, helmet masks carved in the form of a human face are worn. On top of the head there is either an elaborate coiffure or a carved representation of a human activity. The masks of the Epa cult, which is connected with both the ancestors and agriculture, vary enormously according to the town in which they appear. The mask proper, roughly globular, has highly stylized features that vary little; but the superstructure, which may be four feet or more in height, is often of very great complexity. Generally, they are worn during funerals or rites of passage ceremonies and characteristically they are composed of many elements – usually a human-face helmet mask topped by an elaborate standing figure. When not worn, these masks are kept in shrines where they are honored with libations and prayers. The Ogboni society brass figures, called Edan, are cast in pairs and attached to spikes and a chain runs from head to head to join the pair. They are worn over the shoulders of Ogboni members as sign of office or as an amulet. Large brass figures, called onile, are carved as a pair and represent the male and female aspects of Ile, the earth Goddess. A variety of palm nut containers used for divination are made with caryatides depicting women. Societies and cults still hold celebrations today during the many masked festivities in which costumes of fiber or fabric, masks, music, and dance form one interlocking whole. The most widely distributed cult is of twins, ibeji, whose birth among the Yoruba is unusually frequent. An ibeji statuette is to be made, if one twin died; this ibeji remained with the surviving twin and was treated, fed, and washed as a living child. Their effigies, made on the instructions of the oracle, are among the most numerous of all classes of African sculpture. The equestrian figure is a common theme in Yoruba wood sculpture. It reflects the importance of the cavalry in the campaigns of the kings who created the Oyo Empire as early as the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries. Only Yoruba chiefs and their personal retainers were privileged to use the horse. Nevertheless, the rider and the horse remained an important social symbol and offered an exciting subject for artistic imagination and skill. The diminutive animal and the dwarfish legs of the horseman are typical for this type of figures. Carved doors and house posts are found in shrines and palaces and in the houses of important men. Fulfilling purely secular functions are bowls for kola nuts, offered in welcoming a guest; ayo boards for the game, known also as wari, played with seeds or pebbles in two rows of cuplike depressions; and stools, spoons, combs, and heddle pulleys. Additional important arts include pottery, weaving, beadworking and metalsmithing.

Wonderful Tribal Artifacts Up For Auction

June 6, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

Many Unique Tribal Artifacts Up For Auction For The Month Of June! Lots of International Antiques! http://yqz.me/international-antiques

Antique Asante Ashante Ashanti Tribe of Ghana Fertility Statue Akua’ba Doll http://yqz.me/Fertility-Statue

We’ve found ourselves with a huge estate collection of African, Island and other Tribal artifacts. Many of these are absolutely museum quality. We

http://yqz.me/international-antiques

http://yqz.me/international-antiques

are not experts in this area, but we can read labels on some of them and match others online. If we get something wrong, just let us know and we will try and post it here so everyone can see. We are putting them up in separate auctions over the next few weeks. Check back regularly to see what we get up. GOOD LUCK!!

In this auction we have a carved wood statue. We believe this is a Asante Tribe statue, the head is very much in the disc head style. This is most likely a fertility figure or doll, measuring approx. 12¾” tall. You can see the carved details that indicate that this is a female and a great carved design on the back of the disc head. You can see signs of age in odd discolored spots and a crack in the wood high on the head as well as other small dings and scratches. We found this paragraph about Akua’ba dolls on the Zyama website, a GREAT website:

Asante (Ashanti, Achanti, Ashante, Ashanti), Ghana

The early Asante economy depended on the trade of gold and enslaved peoples to Mande and Hausa traders, as well as to Europeans along the coast. In return for acting as the middlemen in the slave trade, the Asante received firearms, which were used to increase their already dominant power, and various luxury goods that were incorporated into Asante symbols of status and political office. The forest surrounding the Asante served as an important source of kola nuts, which were sought after for gifts and used as a mild stimulant among the Muslim peoples to the north. In traditional Asante society, in which inheritance was through the maternal line, a woman’s essential role was to bear children, preferably girls.

Fertility Statue  http://yqz.me/Fertility-Statue

Fertility Statue http://yqz.me/Fertility-Statue

Akua’ba doll. The Ashanti region of southern Ghana is a remnant of the Ashanti Empire, which was founded in the early 17th century when, according to legend, a golden stool descended from heaven into the lap of the first king, Osei Tutu. In traditional Ashanti society, in which inheritance was through the maternal line, a woman’s essential role was to bear children, preferably girls to continue the matrilineage. Fertility and children are the most frequent themes in the wooden sculptures of the Asante. Such are akua’ba fertility figures. The akua’ba are dolls with disk-shaped heads embodying their concept of beauty and carried by women who want to become pregnant and to deliver a beautiful child. The fame of these objects derives from a legend asserting that a woman who has worn one will give birth to a particularly beautiful daughter. A Ghanaian source indicates another use: when a child disappeared, the akua’ba was placed with food and silver coins at the edge of the forest to attract the malevolent spirit responsible: the spirit would then exchange the child for the statue.

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