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Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham’s Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham’s Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham’s Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy

Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham’s Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy

Antiques

Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham’s Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy

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Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham’s Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy

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Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham’s Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy

March 27, 2015 by Estate Auctions Inc.

Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham’s Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy yqz
Exterior All Maple SUCH A RARE AIR RIFLE Auction Ends April 6, 2015 9:32PM EST http://yqz.me/Chicago_AirRifle

Talking about rarities!! Up in this auction is a piece of history. The Markham Chicago wooden BB gun Sire to Daisy! This is the early model with the stock stamped: “Chicago Air Rifle – Markham’s Patent” on two lines, which many folks put as the very earliest model. It has an exterior that is all maple wood with rosewood stain, double cocking rods pass through the stock. Everything works. There are rubs, scratches and one chip to the wood at the connection near the hinge, all in line with its age. Missing its cleaning rod. It measures approx. 32″ overall length and has a 9.8″ brass barrel liner in the front section. WHAT A RARE PIECE!!

We found an article posted on the Airgun Academy Daily Blog by B.B. Pelletier (Great Blog and Article!!) Which we are quoting excerpts of here.

Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham's Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy yqz Exterior All Maple SUCH A RARE AIR RIFLE

Antique 1886 Chicago Air Rifle-Markham’s Patent FIRST BB GUN Sire to Daisy yqz
Exterior All Maple SUCH A RARE AIR RIFLE

The Markham Chicago wooden BB gun Sire to Daisy!

Originally posted on November 9, 2007
by B.B. Pelletier

The Markham company, the inventor of the modern BB gun (not Daisy, as I will explain in a moment), started in 1886 with the Chicago model. Captain Markham, whose life story is quite interesting, began production of a spring-piston airgun made mostly of wood in Plymouth, Michigan. His plant was situated very near the Plymouth Iron Windmill Company that would soon start making an all-metal BB gun of their own, but Markham’s was first by two years.

The Blue Book of Airguns puts the start of the Markham presence in BB guns in 1887, but as you will learn, Daisy had a vested interest in the date this company began. And back in the early 20th century, they put the date at 1886.

The gun is made from hard rock maple with metal parts attached where needed, not that much different than modern polymer-framed handguns such as the Glock. It broke in the center, and a stiff wire pushed the piston and mainspring back until another bent and flattened wire formed into a trigger blade and sear caught it. The gun is unique in that there is no end to the compression chamber. The breech of the barrel serves that purpose! The metal piston rides inside an open-ended iron liner that serves as the compression chamber.

It feels light and toy-like and is proportioned for a child. There is no trigger guard or safety, because this is the most rudimentary gun possible, yet it’s constructed well enough to have lasted more than a century.

To make the gun ready to shoot, the action is unlatched, then the barrel is broken down the same as with any breakbarrel. Once the sear catches the piston connecting rod, a BB is loaded into the breech. The barrel is closed and latched, making the gun ready to fire.

The sights are extremely fundamental and fixed. Any corrections are made by aim-off, also known as Kentucky windage.

This is for sale and shipment to only the U.S. States.

We comply with all shipping restrictions.

Buyer must be at least 18 years old to purchase. ID proof of age is required.

WWII Bronze Star & Purple Heart Case Named Lot Eugene Carey Maryland

May 25, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

WWII Bronze Star & Purple Heart Case Named Lot Eugene Carey Maryland To View Auction: http://yqz.me/purple-heart
Honoring One Of Americas Finest Auction Ending June 2, 2014 18:50:01 PDT

Purple Heart and WWII Bronze Star http://yqz.me/purple-heart

Purple Heart and WWII Bronze Star
http://yqz.me/purple-heart

To our friends and family on Memorial Day, Have a safe and comforting day and remember to give thanks to those who’ve fought for our Freedoms.

In this auction we have a WWII lot. It contains an engraved bronze star and coffin style box. There is also a coffin style box for a purple heart.

Ebay rules only allow us to sell the purple heart box so this auction is for the box only. You get everything in the photos.

The bronze star bears the name of Eugene M. Carey. We found him to be from Baltimore, MD. The letter included says, “Dear Mom, Here is my Purple Heart. I want you to have it. Love, Gene”. What a sweet sentiment. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE TO ASK. You get everything in the photos. Good Luck!

Estimated shipping weight, (packaged) is 1 lbs 8 oz in a 12 x 10 x 10 box.

Purple Heart and WWII Bronze Star http://yqz.me/purple-heart

Purple Heart and WWII Bronze Star http://yqz.me/purple-heart

History of the purple heart from http://www.thepurpleheart.com/

The award known as the Purple Heart has a history that reaches back to the waning days of the American Revolution. The Continental Congress had forbidden General George Washington from granting commissions and promotions in rank to recognize merit. Yet Washington wanted to honor merit, particularly among the enlisted soldiers. On August 7, 1782, his general orders established the Badge of Military Merit:

“… The General ever desirous to cherish virtuous ambition in his soldiers, as well as to foster and encourage every species of Military merit directs whenever any singularly meritorious action is performed, the author of it shall be permitted to wear on his facings, over his left breast, the figure of a heart in purple cloth or silk edged with narrow lace or binding.”
This award was open only to enlisted men and granted them the distinction of being permitted to pass all guards and sentinels as could commissioned-officers. The names of the recipients were to have been kept in a “Book of Merit” (which has never been recovered). At the present time there are three known recipients of the Badge of Military Merit: Sergeant Elijah Churchill, 2nd Continental Dragoons; Sergeant William Brown, 5th and Sergeant Daniel Bissel, 2nd Connecticut Continental Line Infantry.

Washington stated that the award was to be a permanent one, but once the Revolution ended, the Badge of Merit was all but forgotten until the 20th century.

General John J. “Blackjack” Pershing suggested a need for an award for merit in 1918, but it was not until 1932 that the Purple Heart was created in recognition of Washington’s ideals and for the bicentennial of his birth. General Order No.3 announced the establishment of the award:
“…By order of the President of the United States, the Purple Heart, established by General George Washington at Newburgh, August 7, 1782, during the War of the Revolution is hereby revived out of respect to his memory and military achievements.

By order of the Secretary of War:
Douglas MacArthur
General, Chief of Staff

On May 28, 1932, 138 World War I veterans were conferred their Purple Hearts at Temple Hill, in New Windsor, NY. Temple Hill was the site of the New

Purple Heart WWII http://yqz.me/purple-heart

Purple Heart WWII http://yqz.me/purple-heart

Windsor Cantonment, which was the final encampment of the Continental Army in the winter of 1782-1783. Today, the National Purple Heart continues the tradition begun here in 1932, of honoring veterans who have earned the Purple Heart.
The Purple Heart has undergone many changes with respect to the criteria for being awarded. At first, the Purple Heart was exclusively awarded to Army and Army Air Corps personnel and could not be awarded posthumously to the next of kin. In 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed an executive order allowing the Navy to award the Purple Heart to Sailors, Marines, and Coast Guard personnel. Also in that year, the Purple Heart was made available for posthumous award to any member of the military killed on or after December 7, 1941.

Originally the Purple Heart was awarded for meritorious service. Being wounded was one portion of consideration for merit. With the creation of the Legion of Merit in 1942, the award of the Purple Heart for meritorious service became unnecessary and was therefore discontinued. The Purple Heart, per regulation is awarded in the name of the President of the United States to any member of the Armed Forces of the United States who, while serving under competent authority in any capacity with one of the U.S. Armed Services after April 5, 1917 has been wounded, killed, or has died after being wounded.

Coming Up On Auction This Week! Sword Dagger Knife 800BCE

April 13, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

Luristan Greco Bronze Archaic Blade Weapon Short Sword Dagger Knife Khard NR yqz

Middle to Near Eastern 1200 – 800 BCE

http://yqz.me/Antique-sword-800BCE

http://yqz.me/Antique-sword-800BCE

This Item will go up for Auction April 17, 2014 9:40 EST

Middle Eastern, 1200 – 800 BCE. Luristan Greco Bronze Archaic Blade Weapon Short Sword Dagger Knife Khard. The blade with pronounced mid rib and tapering from the integral crescentic hilt abruptly and ending in a rounded point. The grip integrally cast and un-flanged and ending in a circular section heavy pommel. The bronze of olive green patina with old separation of the bronze layers at some points along the blade and a few newer chipped areas revealing grey metal below. The blade with areas of relative sharpness surviving despite the degradation of the metal. The crescentic hilt seen more commonly on hafted blades with separate cast hilts as opposed to a flat hilt. It measures approx. 17 1/4″ long, the blade itself approx. 13 3/8″.

Generally speaking, the silhouette of the abrupt tapering of the blade near the hilt appears in sword and dagger blades in Greece and the eastern Mediterranean from the 16th century BCE onwards, but almost always with blades hafted to hilts, and in time with blades with extended tangs. The integrally cast full hilt appears to be from 14th century BCE onwards, and particularly moving further east where bronze production and availability may have been greater.

This item appears to have the design, craftsmanship of an archaic example and the bronze having an appropriate level of corrosion, verdigris and patination. To the best of our opinion, it is of the stylistic dating commonly agreed by scholars to be approximately late 2nd millennium to early first millennium BCE, however, it is being sold as is, without metal analysis, radiography or other testing and without guarantee of dating.

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