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Fabulous Line Up of Currier & Ives Hand Painted Lithographs Fabulous Line Up of Currier & Ives Hand Painted Lithographs Fabulous Line Up of Currier & Ives Hand Painted Lithographs

Fabulous Line Up of Currier & Ives Hand Painted Lithographs

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Fabulous Line Up of Currier & Ives Hand Painted Lithographs

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Fabulous Line Up of Currier & Ives Hand Painted Lithographs

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Fabulous Line Up of Currier & Ives Hand Painted Lithographs

December 14, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

At a recent Estate Sale we came across a HUGE collection of Currier & Ives lithographs; an amazing attic find to say the least. We are offering up this veritable mountain of treasures in separate auction for you bidding pleasure. GOOD LUCK and HAPPY BIDDING! http://yqz.me/Currier&IvesHandPaintedLithographs

Currier & Ives Lithograph Mama's Pet

Titled: Mama’s Pet
Publication Date: 1857-1872
Published by: Currier & Ives: 152 Nassau Street NY
Size: Medium folio 9 1/4 x 13 5/8″
Frame: Original period frame crafted with square nails and wavy glass with bubbles
Size with frame: 13 5/8 x 16 5/8″


Your inquiries are welcome!

For those not familiar with Currier & Ives or perhaps just curious about them, here is a little history from Wikipedia:

Currier and Ives was a successful American printmaking firm headed by Nathaniel Currier (1813–1888) and James Merritt Ives (1824–1895). Based in New York City from 1834–1907, the prolific firm produced prints from paintings by fine artists as black and white lithographs that were hand colored. Lithographic prints could be reproduced quickly and purchased inexpensively, and the firm called itself “the Grand Central Depot for Cheap and Popular Prints” and advertised its lithographs as “colored engravings for the people.”

The name Currier & Ives first appeared in 1857, when Currier invited James Merritt Ives (1824–95), the company’s bookkeeper and accountant, to become his partner. James Merritt Ives, who was born on March 5, 1824 in New York City, married Caroline Clark in 1852. She was the sister-in-law of Nathaniel’s brother, Charles Currier, and it was Charles who recommended James Ives to his brother. Nathaniel Currier soon noticed Ives’s dedication to his business and his artistic knowledge and insight into what the public wanted. The younger man quickly became the general manager of the firm, handling the financial side of the business by modernizing the bookkeeping, reorganizing inventory, and streamlining the print process. Ives also helped Currier interview potential artists and craftsmen. The younger man had a flair for gauging popular interests and aided in selecting the images the firm would publish and expanding the firm’s range to include political satire, and sentimental scenes such as sleigh rides in the country and steamboat races. In 1857, Currier made Ives a full partner.

Titled: My Little White Kitties  Publication Date: 1857-1872  Published by: Currier & Ives: 152 Nassau Street NY Size: Medium folio 13 3/4 x 9 1/4"

Titled: My Little White Kitties
Publication Date: 1857-1872
Published by: Currier & Ives: 152 Nassau Street NY
Size: Medium folio 13 3/4 x 9 1/4″

The firm Currier and Ives described itself as “Publishers of Cheap and Popular Prints”. At least 7,500 lithographs were published in the firm’s 72 years of operation. Artists produced two to three new images every week for 64 years (1834–1895), producing more than a million prints by hand-colored lithography. For the original drawings, Currier & Ives employed or used the work of many celebrated artists of the day including J.F. Butterworth, George Inness, Thomas Nast, C.H. Moore, and Eastman Johnson. The stars of the firm were Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait, who specialized in sporting scenes; Louis Maurer, who executed genre scenes; George H. Durrie, who supplied winter scenes; and Fanny Palmer, who liked to do picturesque panoramas of the American landscape, and who was the first woman in the United States to make her living as a full-time artist. All lithographs were produced on lithographic limestone printing plates on which the drawing was done by hand. A stone often took over a week to prepare for printing. Each print was pulled by hand. Prints were hand-colored by a dozen or more women, often immigrants from Germany with an art background, who worked in assembly-line fashion, one color to a worker, and who were paid $6 for every 100 colored prints. The favored colors were clear and simple, and the drawing was bold and direct.

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