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1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock 1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock 1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock

1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock

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1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock

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1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock

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1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock

January 18, 2015 by Estate Auctions Inc.

Antique 1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock A13 Mark
Superb WORKING Condition STUNNING CLOCK 102 Years Old!! Ending January 26, 2015 11:02PM EST http://yqz.me/Westminsterclock

Up in this auction is an amazing estate find. A 1913, (movement marked A13 which is code for the first half of 1913), westminster bracket clock with an exquisite mahogany case, arched beveled glass door. It has a 5 rod chime system. It has the key and pendulum and we did have it up and running

1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock A13 Mark

1913 Junghans Westminster Mahogany Bracket Shelf Clock A13 Mark

just prior to listing. Except for some rubs to the face it is absolutely drop dead gorgeous. It measures approx. 11″ x 8″ x 14 1/2″ high. GOOD LUCK!!

For those not familiar with Junghans, here is their history off of the clockguy site on the internet (GREAT SITE!!):

Gebr Junghans Uhrenfabrik was established by Erhard Junghans with Franz Xaver in 1861 in the Black Forest, making parts for clocks. Erhard Junghans (1823-70) originally followed in his father’s footsteps working as a designer in an Schramberg porcelain factory in the Black Forest.

By 1861, Erhard Junghans had set aside capital to start his own business producing accessories for clocks and subsequently complete clocks. He enlisted his brother Xaver, a cabinetmaker then living in America, to acquire the assembly-line machinery for making clock parts. Once the factory and the equipment were set up, Gerhard focused on running the business, his brother Xaver lead the production of clock cases and a professional clockmaker was hired to oversee the production of movements. After Erhard’s death in 1870, the company was run by his sons Arthur and Erhard Jr.In 1866 the Junghans brand was established and by 1870 they were producing 100 clocks per day. In 1870 Arthur Junghans, son of the founder took over and the company went ahead rapidly.

Following the registration as early as 1877 of the first factory trademark, “eagle with flag”, the JUNGHANS trademark, a clock cogwheel fashioned into a eight-pointed star, became the brand symbol in 1890. Three years later, the millionth timepiece was produced. In 1903 JUNGHANS was the largest clock-maker in the world. They were well-known for producing a wide variety of clocks. The company further expanded over years merging with other well-known German clockmakers including Lenzkirch, Thomas Haller and Gustav Becker.

Antique 1874 E Ingraham Kitchen Mantle Parlor Shelf Gingerbread Alarm Clock

May 13, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

Antique 1874 E Ingraham Kitchen Mantle Parlor Shelf Gingerbread Alarm Clock
Auction Ending May 22, 2014 9:40 EST

http://yqz.me/unique-clock

http://yqz.me/unique-clock

Up in this auction is a great antique clock. Dated with an 1874 patent number on the movement. This is an E. Ingraham Bristol, Conn kitchen / mantle / parlor / shelf gingerbread alarm clock. We tested the clock and the chimes and it chimes the number of the hour and runs fine. It has a solid wood case, an etched ornate glass door. We call it shabby chic due to the oxidation of the metal, the finish has taken the texture of an orange peel and the face of the clock aged with time. But all of that doesn’t take away from the beauty of this clock. It measures approx. 20 1/2″ high and 14 1/2″ wide. Good luck.

We found the following history on the clockguy site on the internet (GREAT SITE!!):

E. Ingraham & Company was formed in 1860, succeeding several earlier clock-manufacturing firms in which casemaker Elias Ingraham had been involved, notably Brewster & Ingrahams (1843-1852), E. & A. Ingrahams (1852-1856) and Elias Ingraham & Company (1857-1860). The firm originally rented, and later purchased, a shop on Birge’s Pond in Bristol, which had been used by a number of clockmaking firms since 1820.

Having originally purchased their movements from various sources, in 1865 the firm decided to establish their own movement making facility. A hardware shop was moved onto a piece of land owned by the firm and veteran clockmaker Anson L. Atwood set up and managed the movement department for Ingraham for some years.

Elias Ingraham (1805-1885) designed a variety of popular cases and case features for the firm, receiving 17 patents between 1857 and 1873. Many of his cases utilized an unusual figure “8” door design for which he had received a patent in 1857. Rosewood veneered case models with names such as “Doric”, “Venetian”, and “Ionic” were often made in several sizes and held their popularity with the public for many years.

Elias Ingraham’s son Edward Ingraham (1830-1892) succeeded his father as head of the business in 1885. Edward had also received an important patent in 1884 for a method of applying black enamel paint (Japan) to wooden clock cases. Using this method to produce cheaper imitations of French marble mantel clocks was a great success. Though the process was soon imitated by most other clock manufacturers, the Ingraham firm became a leading maker of “black mantel” clocks, introducing 221 models plus special order styles in the following three decades.

In 1887, the firm had its first great expansion with the erection of a 300-foot long, 4 story case shop.

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