Spanish Art

 

 

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Antique Vintage 1930s Art Deco Sculpture Plaste Seated Girl Verdigris Finish Antique Vintage 1930s Art Deco Sculpture Plaste Seated Girl Verdigris Finish Antique Vintage 1930s Art Deco Sculpture Plaste Seated Girl Verdigris Finish

Antique Vintage 1930s Art Deco Sculpture Plaste Seated Girl Verdigris Finish

Antiques

Antique Vintage 1930s Art Deco Sculpture Plaste Seated Girl Verdigris Finish

Vintage

Antique Vintage 1930s Art Deco Sculpture Plaste Seated Girl Verdigris Finish

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Antique Vintage 1930s Art Deco Sculpture Plaste Seated Girl Verdigris Finish

March 26, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

In the auction we have a beautiful antique sculpture of a seated girl wearing a diaphanous dress with the original factory green verdigris finish (to resemble bronze). This is a lovely piece dated circa 1930’s and is a molded cast plaster with good casting details and excellent patina to the finish. On the base it reads “MADE IN SPAIN” and “MRI but the rest is illegible.

This beautiful statue measures approximately 9 1/4″ x 7 3/4″.

http://yqz.me/Spanish-Sculpture

http://yqz.me/Spanish-Sculpture

More on Spanish sculptures:

The Plateresque style extended from beginnings of the 16th century until the last third of the century and its stylistic influence pervaded the works of all great Spanish artists of the time. Alonso Berruguete (sculptor, painter and architect) is called the “Prince of Spanish sculpture” because of the grandeur, originality, and expressiveness achieved in his works. His main works were the upper stalls of the choir of the Cathedral of Toledo, the tomb of Cardinal Tavera in the same Cathedral, and the altarpiece of the Visitation in the church of Santa Úrsula in the same locality. Other notable sculptors were Bartolomé Ordóñez, Diego de Siloé, Juan de Juni and Damián Forment. Another period of Spanish Renaissance sculpture, the Baroque, encompassed the last years of the 16th century and extended into the 17th century until reaching its final flowering the 18th, developing a truly Spanish school and style, of sculpture, more realistic, intimate and independently creative that that of the previous one which was tied to European trends, especially those of the Netherlands and Italy. There were two Schools of special flair and talent: the Seville School, to which Juan Martínez Montañés belonged (called the Sevillian Fidias), whose most celebrated works are the Crucifix in the Cathedral of Seville, another in Vergara, and a Saint John; and the Granada School, to which Alonso Cano belonged, to whom an Immaculate Conception and a Virgin of Rosary, are attributed. Another notable Andalusian Baroque sculptors were Pedro de Mena, Pedro Roldán and his daughter Luisa Roldán, Juan de Mesa and Pedro Duque Cornejo. The Valladolid school of the 17th century (Gregorio Fernández, Francisco del Rincón) was succeeded in the 18th century, although with less brilliance, by the Madrid School, and it was soon transformed into a purely academic style by the middle of the century. In turn, the Andalusian school was replaced by that of Murcia, epitomised in the person of Francisco Salzillo, during the first half of the century. This last sculptor is distinguished by the originality, fluidity, and dynamic treatment of his works, even in those representations of great tragedy. More than 1,800 works are attributed to him, the most famous products of his hand being the Holy Week floats (pasos) in Murcia, most notable amongst which are those of the Agony in the Garden and the Kiss of Judas.

In the 20th century the most important Spanish sculptors were Julio González, Pablo Gargallo, Eduardo Chillida and Pablo Serrano.

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