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The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends! The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends! The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends!

The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends!

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The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends!

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The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends!

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The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends!

June 17, 2014 by Estate Auctions Inc.

ORIG Antique Etching James Gillray British Political Satire Cartoon On Taxes yqz
The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends! Auction Ending Jun 24, 2014 19:16:01 PDT http://yqz.me/taxes

http://yqz.me/taxes ORIG Antique Etching James Gillray British Political Satire Cartoon On Taxes yqz The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends!

http://yqz.me/taxes ORIG Antique Etching James Gillray British Political Satire Cartoon On Taxes yqz
The Battle Over Taxes NEVER Ends!

A political cartoon by the famous late 18th- early 19th century British cartoonist, James Gillray. This hand tinted print is framed and under glass, with a label on the back that indicates it was sold by the Fine Art Pictures and Framing department of John Wanamaker of Philadelphia, New York and Paris. One of the things that the Wanamaker Department store used to do was to take wonderful old prints and engravings and frame them, putting them for sale in the store. This would be one of those.

Some things just never change. One of those things is taxes. For some reason, those who collect taxes never have enough, and those who pay taxes never want to pay them. In this picture, attributed to James Gillray, two prosperous looking men are at the door of a small business man, who doesn’t have anywhere close to the same well fed and clothed appearance of the tax collectors at his door. The business man protests that he is being taxed to the point where he won’t have a house nor hole to put his head in, while the collectors below, who obviously know better, inform the taxpayer that he doesn’t need a house. He could move into the garret (attic) or the cellar, but the taxes must be paid, for the good of the dear country. On the right hand side, of the picture, you can see some shabbily dressed people at the “New Brewery for the Benefit of the Poor,” one fellow is at the pump handle, while another has his mouth under the spigot, sucking it in while the overflow is wasted in the street, creating a puddle where the tax collector stands. There is more to the print, which you can see in the photos, but that is most of the story. Doesn’t it sound like today’s headlines?

This is in very good to excellent condition, some mellowing of colors from age, but the mat and print are clean, ready to be displayed. It measures approx. 11″ by 13½”, the mat opening 6¼” by 8⅝”. What a great piece, a reminder that there is nothing new under the sun. Good Luck!

We found this little bit of a biography about James Gillray on the Original Political Cartoon website, a Great website:

Gillray, James (1756 – 1815)

James Gillray was the leading caricaturist of the late eighteenth century, and is generally recognised as the father of the political cartoon. Gillray worked exclusively for Hannah Humphrey, the younger sister of William Humphrey of Gerrard Street. Gillray’s engravings helped Humphrey become London’s leading print-seller. In 1793, Gillray starting living in a room above Hannah Humphrey’s shop in Old Bond Street. He also accompanied her when she moved to new premises in 1794 (New Bond Street) and 1797 (St James’s Street). Gillray appears to have held liberal views in his youth but after 1793 he became a supporter of William Pitt and the Tories. When a friend asked Gillray why his prints were so critical of the Whigs he replied: “they are poor, they do not buy my prints and I must draw on the purses of the larger parties.” Gillray’s cartoons were especially critical of Radicals such as Charles Fox.

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